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The best Museums in Queens for a day of Culture

Looking for the Best Museums In Queens NY, you have come to the right place as we have listed the best museums to visit.  

Here’s the deal… 

If you’re looking for a great museum to visit, Queens NYC  is the place to be.  With so many world-class museums, you’re sure to find something that interests you.  From history and art to science and technology, there’s something for everyone in Queens

So put on your walking shoes and get ready to explore!

Museum of the Moving Image

The Museum of the Moving Image located in Astoria Queens is the country’s only museum dedicated to the art, history, technique, and technology of the moving image in all its forms. The museum is a one-of-a-kind destination for audiences of all ages and interests, from connoisseurs of classic cinema to children and families and avid gamers.

It’s a long way from Hollywood, but Queens has one of the finest movie museums in the country. The entertaining institution is rooted in the “Behind the Screen” permanent exhibit, which features everything from historic cameras to vintage TV sets and rare merchandise like the prototypes used to create a King Kong action figure. But the real draw is the museum’s interactive exhibits, like the one that allows you to dub your own voice into famous movie scenes.  The regular movie screenings are another treat, including 1940s Hollywood dramas, digital shorts, and the popular “See it Big” series, which presents classic films.

Louis Armstrong House Museum

Louis Armstrong House Museum was where America’s favorite Jazz couple Louis Armstrong and Lucille resided for the majority of their lives. The couple bought the home in 1943, living in the heart of what is often referred to as “Black Corona.”

The home has since been turned into a museum, fully and lovingly restored to immaculate condition, and doubles as a great tribute to one of mankind’s finest contributors to the art of music. Be sure to listen out for exclusive recordings made by the late great Armstrong that softly plays as patrons tour the home.

The museum serves as a reference source for information about the artist and presents public programs to preserve Armstrong’s cultural legacy.

The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays; noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $10 for adults, $7 for seniors, students, and children.

Queens County Farm Museum

It’s easy to forget that New York City was once mostly farmland. And the Queens County Farm Museum goes way back – all the way to 1697. The 47-acre space is the city’s largest remaining tract of undisturbed farmland and the longest continuously farmed site in the entire state. Cows, chickens, horses, sheep, pigs, and goats live among historic farm buildings, a greenhouse complex, planting fields, an orchard, and a vineyard.

The animals are easily accessible to visitors, and the museum sells feed for the kids who like getting up close and personal. Year-round, the farm hosts free guided tours of the farmhouse to the public on Saturdays and Sundays. Hayrides are offered on weekends from April through October.

Noguchi Museum

The Noguchi Museum was founded and designed by Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi for the display of what he considered to be representative examples of his life’s work. Opened in 1985, the museum is housed in a converted industrial building connected to a building and interior garden of Noguchi’s design. Noguchi was an early pioneer who led the metamorphosis of the Long Island City area into the arts district it is today. The museum is considered in itself to be one of the artist’s greatest works.

The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays through Fridays and from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. General admission is $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. It is free for public high school students with a valid ID.

New York Hall of Science

The New York Hall of Science has come a long way. Originally built as a pavilion for the 1964 World’s Fair, it’s now New York City’s largest science and technology center. The museum enthusiastically courts kids, with over 450 interactive exhibits that invite “touching, exploring, and manipulating.” Get up-close views of a colony of leaf-cutting ants through a video camera, follow the evolution of space exploration, from rockets to shuttles, and flex your muscles at Internet arm-wrestling. You can also test your skills at mini-golf and rock-climbing.

Voelker Orth Museum

The Voelker Orth Museum (Bird Sanctuary and Victorian Garden) is a home-turned-museum that provides insight into the lives of our forefathers.
Particularly appealing is the carriage house and garden
Note the formality of the correct Victorian tea party setting inside the 1880 mansion.

The objective of the Voelker Orth Museum, which was renovated as a museum in 2002, is to preserve the history of Long Island and Queens.
Visitors are welcome to join in on neighborhood walks (which are free) as well as Sunday teas and presentations.
Snacks and a gift store are available.

Suggested admission is $2.

Queens Museum

The Queens Museum is a small museum dedicated to presenting the highest quality visual arts and educational programming for people in the New York metropolitan area, and particularly for the residents of Queens, a uniquely diverse, ethnic, cultural, and international community. Its most famous exhibit is the Panorama of New York City. The museum recently underwent a massive expansion and renovation.

Many of the exhibits displayed in the Queens Museum are short-term, so there is always something new and exciting to see.

Inside the museum, there is a cute small café with decent-priced snacks and beverages.  There is also a gift shop that carries a mix of art-inspired mementos.  They also carry some jewelry that is original 1939 and 1964 World’s Fair Memorabilia.

Suggested admission is $8 for adults and children over 12 and $4 for students and seniors.

King Manor Museum

King Manor Museum (Rufus King House) located in Rufus King Park in Jamaica, is a historic house museum to preserve and interpret the home and legacy of Rufus King. The museum’s goal is to make history relevant and immediate and to foster an awareness of the roots of the present and a deeper appreciation of history as an ongoing process.

King Manor is home to fun programs that parents and kids alike can enjoy, as well as a great way to educate yourself on the life of Rufus King and the Southeast Queens area during the 19th century.

Suggested admission is $5 for adults, $3 for seniors and students, and free for children 16 and under.

Guided tours are offered from February through December.

MoMA PS1

MoMA PS1 Museum located in Long Island City devotes its energy and resources to displaying the most experimental art in the world. A catalyst and an advocate for new ideas, discourses and trends in contemporary art, MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) PS1 actively pursues emerging artists, new genres and adventurous new work by recognized artists in an effort to support innovation in contemporary art.

MoMA PS1, one of the oldest and largest nonprofit contemporary art museums in the U.S. Founded in 1971, this “artistic laboratory” has never wavered from its core principle of supporting and celebrating contemporary art, from established artists like Sol DeWitt to emerging ones brought to view by public programs like the Young Architects Program (YAP). On Sundays, follow the sounds of DJs and electronica at the Sunday Session, with international music and sound installations. And during the summer, enjoy outdoor parties in the courtyard on Saturdays.

If you’re looking for a great museum to explore in Queens, the “Best Museums in Queens NY” list we provided should give you plenty of ideas. Did we miss any of your favorite Art Galleries?

Let us know in the comments and be sure to share your photos with us when you visit!